Land Transport Authority

North East Line


North East Line Train

What is the North East Line?

With 16 stations and spanning 20km, the North East Line (NEL) is the world’s first fully automated underground driverless heavy rail rapid transit line.

As the first MRT project to take place almost 10 years after the North-South and East-West Lines, the ambitious project weaved through busy city and heritage areas such as such as Chinatown, Clarke Quay and Dhoby Ghaut, through to mature and new residential estates of Potong Pasir and Sengkang.

Being fully underground, it ensures the safety of all its passengers by providing platform screen doors at all the station. The stations are also fully air-conditioned to give a better travelling experience for commuters.

The NEL is also the first MRT line to feature Art in Transit, a public art project by the LTA. Art in Transit is now a regular feature across all MRT stations in Singapore.


Where is the North East Line?

 

North East Line Train System Map

The NEL routes through the heart of the city from HarbourFront to the budding housing townships in Sengkang and Punggol.

The line is connected to the Circle Line, East-West Line, North-South Line stations as well as Punggol and Sengkang LRT stations. In the future, the line will also be connected to the Downtown Line at Little India.


MORE TRAINS FROM 2015 

The NEL will get 18 more trains, which will be delivered progressively from 2015, and increase its capacity by up to 70 per cent. With the additional trains, commuters on the NEL will experience shorter waiting times and a more comfortable ride.

 

News Release: LTA and SMRT Award Contracts for New Trains and Re-Signalling Project




Did You Know?

Singapore’s train fleet will be increased by 70% for NEL and 40% for CCL respectively (that’s a total of 34 trainsets!) progressively from 2015 to 2016.

We’re also running a re-signalling project for the North-South and East-West Lines. The upgrade will allow trains to run at intervals of 100 seconds at peak periods, compared to the existing intervals of 120 seconds.