More than 7,000 responses for LTMP 2040 Master Plan

News Releases
12 Jan 2019

Everyone has a part to play in ensuring a convenient, inclusive and safe land transport system

Since the start of public engagement for the Land Transport Master Plan (LTMP) 2040 in August 2018, more than 7,000 members of the public and industry stakeholders have stepped forward and given their views on the future of our land transport system.

2          Over the last four months, LTA has held 4 focus group discussions, 7 REACH Listening Points, and also sought views through electronic polls. The respondents come from diverse backgrounds and include commuters, transport operators and public transport workers. They gave suggestions on having more convenient walk, cycle and ride (WCR) options, building a safer, more inclusive transport system and shaping journeys that can contribute to healthy living.

Shaping the Future of Land Transport Together

3          Based on the feedback gathered, the LTMP Advisory Panel (LAP) members sought participants’ views at the 4th focus group discussion today:

  • Prioritisation of WCR modes, eg. through road re-design, expansion of the rail network and the use of technology;
  • More pedestrian and active mobility-friendly towns to promote healthier living; and
  • Improved transport infrastructure so that commuters with special needs can also move around easily and more independently.

Balancing Competing Priorities

4          Participants discussed some of the competing priorities that had surfaced during the engagement process. These include: 

  • Striking a balance between faster journeys, greater convenience and inclusivity. More will walk, cycle and ride on public transport when they are more accessible and convenient.  As we slow down our buses and trains to help the less mobile board safely, this could result in slower journeys for other commuters. Another common request was to increase the number of bus stops to allow for more convenient journeys.  This again, would also translate into longer journey times.
  • Finding a balance between safety and speed. Respondents wanted a safe land transport system. To make roads and paths safer for the vulnerable, speed limits on certain roads and paths, such as those near schools or at places with more elderly pedestrians, will have to be reviewed. Should these measures be implemented, other users of these roads and paths will experience slower journeys.
  • Prioritising different modes of transport. There were also suggestions to increase bus speeds and promote active mobility more widely.  To do this, we may have to convert existing car lanes to be dedicated bus lanes or to wider paths for pedestrians and users of active mobility devices. This may mean that private vehicles will have fewer car lanes to travel on, slowing down car speeds.

5          Participants recognised that there is no neat solution to resolve competing priorities among different group users and needs due to the trade-offs required, as well as our space and fiscal constraints. While some of these constraints could be addressed with technology, participants also acknowledged that personal responsibility was key, and that individuals had a role to play in ensuring that the land transport system was shared in a gracious and safe manner.

6          The LTMP Advisory Panel will consider the feedback gathered from the public engagements to formulate a set of recommendations that will be submitted to Government by the middle of February 2019.